Friday, 8 December 2017

How To Sleep Better At Night

Who doesn’t want to sleep soundly at night? Just the thought of your warm comfy bed is enough to help you get through the day and make it home in one piece despite the daily grind. It is perhaps the same sentiments of the entire population who only want nothing but to retire to bed as soon as they can and revisit dreamland to temporarily forget about their worries in life. This restorative process does our body a lot of good, so we actually have a good reason why getting an extra snooze is good for our body.

Unfortunately, not everyone is blessed to be able to drift off to sleep once they hit the sack for a lot of reasons. First are health issues like sleep disorders that do not seem to go away no matter what you do. Then, there are those distractions in our environment that make sleeping impossible no matter how sleepy you are. Admit it that you have been putting off bedtime because you are still preoccupied with something that it becomes alright with you to lose sleep for several hours or more. This is the dilemma faced by many today as technology proved to be a powerful yet enjoyable distraction we all can’t resist even if it means sleeping a little later and ending up with bags under our eyes.

Despite these limitations, this study is the first to suggest any kind of strong link between purpose in life and sleep. Given how common sleep problems are, anything that may suggest new avenues for treatment are important to explore. Perhaps developing a sense of purpose in life could be as effective at improving sleep as following healthy habits, such as limiting coffee. In addition to promoting good sleep hygiene, doctors may end up recommending mindfulness practices or exploring one’s values as ways of helping older adults sleep better. Given how elusive a good night’s sleep has become for many, it’s well worth exploring. The impact of poor sleep goes far beyond our own personal health, as the side effects have the potential to wreak havoc on other people’s lives as well.

Developing a sense of purpose in life may simultaneously convey other benefits too in addition to better sleep. Research has linked experiencing purpose in life to a variety of other positive outcomes including better brain functioning, reduced risk of heart attack, and even a higher income.A person with a greater sense of purpose in their life would surely be better off while also serving as a positive example in the lives of those they know.

(Via: https://www.scientificamerican.com/article/the-secret-to-a-better-nights-sleep-a-sense-of-purpose/)

We need to do a lifestyle check to determine where we are lacking and why we can’t establish healthy sleeping habits. It is not comforting to know that the diagnosis of sleep disorders is on the rise, which likely reflects our deteriorating sleep health and overall health, actually. And we are not just putting the blame on sleep disorders that we totally do not have control over. Our reckless behaviors concerning our health are what shortens our lifespan by a lot of years and that is a fact proven by science.

Food can determine a lot of things beyond your pant size -- especially how well you sleep. But you can’t just keep stuffing pizza into your face until you pass out -- in order to properly fill your belly for an epic night of zzz’s, you need to follow a handful of important tips. We talked to Dr. Rebecca Scott, PhD, research assistant professor of neurology at NYU Langone Health, about the best way to adjust your diet for a good night’s rest. With those factors in mind, we had recipe developer Joanna Keohane concoct these concepts into consumables, so you can just chill -- which is pretty important if you want to sleep through the night.

Yes, tryptophan is important

If you’ve witnessed an American Thanksgiving in the last decade, then you’ve probably encountered an article about why you fall asleep on your aunt’s sofa after your third serving of turkey and mashed potatoes. Most have pointed to tryptophan, an amino acid that helps the brain produce serotonin, as the reason for the crash. That’s because without tryptophan, your body can’t make serotonin, and you only get tryptophan from the foods you eat.

(Via: https://www.thrillist.com/eat/nation/what-to-eat-to-sleep-right)

To get back all that lost sleep and ensure you do not compromise yourself and your health even more, you need to do a total lifestyle modification. It starts with the food you eat or must avoid eating hours before retiring to bed that may interfere with sleep. It can also mean disciplining yourself to live healthily like exercising and limiting tech use during bedtime hours among others.

There are many tips you can try to sleep soundly at night that are effective as long as your problem is not physiological in nature. However, it still depends on you how you live your life and how you value sleep. You can’t get back lost sleep no matter how much you oversleep the next day. That sleep deprivation is sure to impact your health sooner or later, so take the first step now before it is too late.

However, if you are suffering from a sleep disorder, there’s no denying that you’ll need medical help. At times your doctor will prescribe you with sleep aids that not only addresses the breathing problems associated with sleep apnea but ensure you sleep better too like https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/good-morning-snore-solution or https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/snorerx. They aren’t that expensive and are obviously more convenient to use than a traditional CPAP machine.

How To Sleep Better At Night is courtesy of TSMR Blog



source https://snoringmouthpiecereview.org/sleep-health/how-to-sleep-better-at-night

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